Working with Rich Text in Enterprise Apps


Developing enterprise apps often involves integrating text that includes embedded formatting information in the form of rich text  – whether it’s from back end CMS systems or content entered directly by users.

The Rich Text control in MobileTogether makes this easy.

Rich text control in enterprise app

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Inform Users with Sound Effects in Mobile Apps


Sound effects in mobile apps can reinforce functionality and make an app more fun to use. MobileTogether makes it easy and convenient for mobile developers to add a standard set of sounds to user interface actions across all mobile platforms. For instance, developers might want to add sound effects to signify the success or failure of a file transfer or database transaction. Or simply add a keyclick sound to a button as feedback for a user tap.

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Mobile App Calendar Integration with MobileTogether


MobileTogether gives developers holistic access to the rich feature sets of mobile devices for cross-platform deployment of native apps for Android, iOS (iPhone, iPad), Windows 8 & 10, Windows Phone 10, and HTML5  browsers for other users. MobileTogether apps created from a single design can seamlessly access mobile device camera, messaging, GPS, audio, email features, and even feature mobile app calendar integration.

Since MobileTogether uses a combination of visual drag-and-drop UI design and easy-to-understand functional programming for data selection, it’s easy for any programmer or web developer to build highly sophisticated apps to read and write calendar events for all platforms. For instance, a mobile scheduling app for a large, distributed user base could help everyone easily sync their calendars.

e-reader

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Efficient MobileTogether Services on Backend Servers for Mobile Apps


MobileTogether Server Advanced Edition services on backend servers for mobile apps execute independently of any app running on a mobile device, based on a variety of triggers. MobileTogether services can provide background functionality to mobile apps or perform automated standalone actions without requiring any end user to interact with a mobile app. For instance, a MobileTogether service could generate a report and email it to the server administrator at a specified time. Or, a service could query a database based on some external criteria and perform an action such as sending a notification or an email.

A MobileTogether Server service is a set of MobileTogether Designer actions deployed to the server as a specialized solution file.

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How to Make a Pop-up Window in an App


During mobile app development there’s often a quick action the developer wishes to let the user to complete or a message that can be delivered on top of the current app view – otherwise known as a pop-up window. These are useful for letting the end user complete a process or view a message payload without interrupting his or her progress in the app.

MobileTogether makes it easy to configure pop-up windows of any size. Let’s take a look at how it works.

User interacting with app

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Mark Your Calendar for this MobileTogether Release


The newest version of Altova’s cross-platform framework for mobile app development includes comprehensive calendar integration for building apps with scheduling functionality. You’ll also find support for building and triggering services, easy to configure pop-up windows, and much more.

Whether you’re building enterprise apps or native apps for the major platforms, this release has the tools you need to add even more great functionality — without increasing development time.

Let’s take a look at what’s new.

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Multi-Language Localization for Mobile Apps


MobileTogether includes support to seamlessly localize mobile apps in multiple languages. This empowers developers to build one version of a mobile app that works across many languages as well as across multiple platforms.

Developers can include translations in a single MobileTogether app design for all text phrases required, and when any end-user runs the app, whether on an Android phone, an iPhone, Windows desktop, or any other supported platform, the language for the app is selected to match the language for the device operating system.

With multi-language localization, even text-to-speech functionality is localized to the user’s native language.

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In an earlier post on text-to-speech functionality, we first built a simple demo app. In this post, we will use an enhanced version, shown below on an Android phone, to illustrate localization:

MobileTogether multi-lingual localization demo app android

Our multi-language localization demo app includes cross-platform support for English, German, French, Spanish, and Italian languages.

Text strings for each language are assigned in the MobileTogether Designer Localization dialog:

MobileTogether multi-lingual localization dialog

The top portion of the dialog lets developers assign text in different languages for each control in the app: the Speak, Silence, and Exit buttons along the top of the app window are translated in the top three rows of the Localization dialog.

When the app launches on any user’s mobile device, the default language specified in the device operating system setting determines which text is displayed for each control. If the end user is running some other language, default values from the Localization dialog are used.

The green plus button at the top of the dialog lets the developer add support for additional languages from a list of standard language codes:

Multi-lingual localization for mobile apps -- adding a new language

MobileTogether multi-language localization even supports languages that use non-roman alphabets such as Azerbaijani in Cyrillic, listed as az-Cyrl-AZ in the menu above, or the Japanese Kanji alphabet. In fact, all the demo applications installed with MobileTogether are localized for German, French, Spanish, and Japanese languages. Shown below is a portion of the Localization dialog for the demo Mortgage Calculator app, where various label text is specified:

Multi-language localization with non-roman alphabets

The bottom portion of the Localization dialog lets developers assign text for named strings. In our demo app, these are phrases that will be displayed in message boxes and spoken during execution.

If it’s not practical for a developer to translate all the text required in a large, complex application, the Export and Import buttons at the bottom of the Localization dialog permit management of multi-language localization text in XML files outside the MobileTogether Designer. A translator or other language professional can create or fine-tune localized text in an XML editor like Altova XMLSpy.

When our demo app launches, an Action Group assigns the correct localized phrases to nodes in the data tree:

Multi-language localization -- loading messages in the user's language

After multi-language localization text strings have been defined, you can even change the language assigned during simulation to check localization before deploying the app. The Simulation Language option is available in the Project menu and the languages offered correspond to those defined in the Localization dialog for the project.

Multi-language localization with simulated execution in a new language

Here is a view of the Mortgage Calculator demo application running in the Simulator window, where the Simulation Language is Japanese and the selected target device is an iPhone 6 in portrait orientation:

Simulating mobile app execution during multi-language localization

The Set Language Action

You can even empower end users to run your app in any language you have localized–without changing the language setting for the device operating system. This feature could be useful in a language-learning environment, or for apps running on a workstation or tablet shared among users who speak different languages.

Our multi-language localization demo app lets the user choose a new language via a combo box control. The app then confirms the choice via a message box, and restarts the app in the new language.

Shown below is a screenshot of the app running on an iPhone. The user has opened the language selector combo box and scrolled to the choice for Italian, but not yet accepted the selection by clicking Done. (On an Android phone, the user would tap simply tap the new choice.)

Multi-language localization with end-user language selection

When the user confirms the language selection, the app restarts in Italian:

Multi-language localization demo of a mobile app running in Italian

The restaurant text in the edit field is translated because it is one of the standard text strings defined in the Localization dialog:

Translating mobile app messages for multi-language localization

The developer of the demo app wanted to be courteous and not leave any end user accidentally stranded in an unfamiliar language, so setting the new language employs several actions:

First, a text to speech action reads a restart warning message in the current app language.

Second, a message box is displayed containing the same restart warning, also in the current language, with the choices OK or Cancel.

If the user chooses OK, the userLanguage element is updated with the userChoice value set by the combo box, then the Set Language action restarts the app.

If the user chooses Cancel instead of OK, the combo box selection is reset to the current language and the app continues running without changing the language, waiting for the next user input.

You can try localizing your own cross-platform mobile apps by downloading the free-to-use MobileTogether Designer, which comes with integrated help, tutorials and many sample apps.

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